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Posts Tagged ‘gender violence’

More than 1,600 Women Murdered by Men in One Year, New Study Finds from the Violence Policy Center, 09/20/2016

September 21st, 2016 No comments

img-icon-newsThis annual VPC report is being released in advance of Domestic Violence Awareness Month in October. The study uses 2014 data, the most recent year for which information is available.

The study also ranks the states on the rate of women murdered by men. In 2014, Alaska had the highest rate, followed by Louisiana, Nevada, Oklahoma, and South Carolina. (A list of the 10 states with the highest rates of women murdered by men follows below.)

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‘It’s never too late to be all you can be’: Domestic violence campaigner Rosie Batty partners with make up brand Lancôme for new ‘Love Your Age’ project from DailyMail, 09/17/2016

September 21st, 2016 No comments

img-icon-newsRosie Batty, whose son Luke was murdered by his own father at cricket practice, has partnered with make up brand Lancôme for a new campaign.

The 2015 Australian of the Year is the face of the Love Your Age campaign and is the first Australian to front a commercial for the brand.

The campaign will help raise awareness of domestic violence – a cause that Ms Batty has championed since her son was killed in 2014.

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The Hidden Impact Of Domestic Violence On The Gender Wage Gap from Fast Company, 08/30/2016

September 2nd, 2016 No comments

img-icon-newsPay equity is about more than just gender equality at work. Violence against women also plays a role in the wage gap, according to a report from McKinsey & Company.

The Power of Parity: Advancing Women’s Equality in the United States, finds that closing the wage gap could add up to $4.3 trillion annually to the GDP by 2025. But violence against women is one of the six factors impacting pay equity in the United States.

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How a murdered woman became invisible in the coverage of her death from the guardian, 09/01/2016

September 2nd, 2016 No comments

img-icon-newsFive people die in Cavan, and in the days to come, Irish newspapers are full of questions. “Why did he do it?” asks one national daily, picturing a man and his three sons. “How could he kill those poor boys?” asks another.

Irish media outlets continued to ask why he had done it, and the nature of the coverage prompted Dublin-based writer, Linnea Dunne, to ask questions of her own in a blog article headlined “Rest in peace, invisible woman.”

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The Heartbreaking Issue In Brazil We Should Be Talking About from Refinery29, 08/11/2016

August 11th, 2016 No comments

– Trigger Warning – Sexual violence is a serious issue in Brazil due to a lack of public policies, and it stems from a lot of other issues. In my case, my mother suffered, too. She wasn’t sexually abused, but she suffered physical violence. She had to work to provide for us. When she saw she could be safe with a man, she didn’t want to lose the security he brought home because of us. If these issues are tackled through awareness sessions, girls could have a different future. Over time, I’ve learned to forgive my mother, and we have a good relationship now.

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Domestic violence is a workplace issue from CIO, 08/11/2016

August 11th, 2016 No comments

img-icon-newsSometimes a workplace is the only safe space victims and survivors have. I know, because work literally saved my life. What can you do to make sure your workplace is a safe space for those who are victims or survivors? You can be flexible, for starters. If you suspect or are certain that someone you work with is a victim of DV or IPV, cut them some slack. Even if they don’t want to admit it themselves (it took me much longer than it should have to admit what was happening and even more time to work out the logistics of leaving). Give them time off if they need it, whether it’s to nurse injuries or to go to court or to search for a shelter or a new apartment. You also can accommodate requests for varied working hours, or a different office space, or a new phone number or email address. You can make sure your security is tight so that an abuser can’t get to them physically or virtually.

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