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Posts Tagged ‘gender violence’

Mongolia looks to Alaska for help handling domestic violence from KNOM, 01/28/2016

January 29th, 2016 No comments

img-icon-newsWhen it comes to this issue, the two places have a lot in common. That’s according to Tuvshinjargal Gantumur, a psychologist and manager at the National Center Against Violence in Mongolia. Through a translator, she said the similarities between Alaska and Mongolia are what made the delegation eager to take this “study trip.”

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Coalition continues domestic violence outreach with new school program from the Indianapolis Recorder, 01/21/2016

January 29th, 2016 No comments

img-icon-newsThe Community-wide Plan to End Domestic Violence (CWP 3.0) is a partnership among several community organizations — spearheaded by Domestic Violence Network (DVN) — that launched in October 2013.

For the younger children, Playworks uses play to transform schools’ culture and climate, serving 10,000 Indiana kids every day. Students involved in the program learn to channel natural leadership abilities into an inclusive environment and learn valuable collaboration skills. Marc McAleavy, executive director of Playworks Indiana, says the group’s methods are data-proven.

“Last year in our partner schools, we had an 86 percent decrease in bullying. The direct impact of playing more is that kids become more kind,” he said.

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hristie vetoed bill to track domestic violence offenders, but fight’s not over from New Jersey 101.5, 01/27/2016

January 28th, 2016 No comments

img-icon-newsMuch to the surprise of its sponsor, Gov. Chris Christie vetoed a bill that would have created a four-year pilot program in Ocean County to electronically track convicted domestic violence offenders using GPS devices that would alert victims on their cell phones if their attackers were nearby.

Assemblyman Ron Dancer said he will reintroduce “Lisa’s Law,” soon and refuted the belief of some that the technology to implement the law did not exist.

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Report: Female migrants face sexual violence from DW, 01/18/2016

January 28th, 2016 No comments

img-icon-newsThe report released Monday by the human rights group was based on interviews with 40 women and girls in Germany and Norway last month who had traveled from Turkey up through the Balkans to reach western Europe.

“After living through the horrors of the war in Iraq and Syria these women have risked everything to find safety for themselves and their children,” Tirana Hassan, Amnesty International’s Crisis Response director, said in a news release. “But from the moment they begin this journey they are again exposed to violence and exploitation, with little support or protection.”

Women and girls traveling alone or accompanied only by children said they felt particularly under threat in Hungary, Croatia and Greece, where they were forced to sleep alongside hundreds of male refugees.

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Anti-human trafficking Asian task force launched in Los Angeles from the Inquirer, 1/18/2016

January 19th, 2016 No comments

img-icon-newsLOS ANGELES– California has the largest number of Asian Pacific Islanders (APIs) in the country, sees the most human trafficking cases among the 50 states in the U.S., the National Human Trafficking Resource Center reported in 2014. Yet resources for API trafficking victims and survivors are limited.

In response, the Asian Pacific Policy & Planning Council (A3PCON) launched the Asian Pacific Islander Human Trafficking Task Force, which was officially announced on Wednesday, January 13, at the Thai Community Development Center (TCDC) in Los Angeles.

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Know how you can easily shut down domestic violence services? Erase women in need from official statistics from Independent, 1/19/2016

January 19th, 2016 No comments

img-icon-newsSylvia Walby’s research on violence against women in the UK is devastating for three reasons: violent crime against women is on the increase; the experiences of domestic violence survivors have been erased by the way official statistics are collected and the increase in violence parallels the removal of support services.

This research would not be as revelatory as it is, had the government actually been recording violence against women accurately. Currently, the number of crimes that one individual can report to the survey is capped at five. All Sylvia Walby did was remove that cap.

Even if a woman has been assaulted by her partner five times, fifty times or five hundred times, the survey will only record five of those crimes. On a personal level, this systematically invalidates women’s experiences. On a statistical level, the experiences of “high frequency victims” – many of which are suffering domestic violence – are hugely under-reported.

The Office for National Statistics says it is necessary because otherwise the sheer number of crimes committed by perpetrators against the same individual would skew the rest of the statistics. That’s right: the harm done by perpetrators of domestic violence is so devastating that calculating it defies statistics.

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